Category Archives: garden stuff

Yellow

Narcissus ‘Tête á Tête’ bought last Saturday are now in full bloom. Many of them have two trumpets on one stem, hence the name. The only lemon produced by my little tree is ready to harvest.

The Acacia baileyana or Cootamundra wattle on the driveway is putting on a fine show. This species flowers far too early for Wattle Day on September 1, and it does naturalise too easily but I still really like it.

To market to market

An overnight low of -2 Celsius with frost was followed by a glorious sunny day. Perfect for a visit to the monthly Warrandyte Market. This has to be the prettiest and most dog friendly market around. It used to be a community market but I noticed it is now a commercial operation. This didn’t seem to change anything.

The good weather brought out lots of browsers and the hot food sellers were doing a roaring trade. There is a good mix of produce, craft, food and plants.

Vegan Row was very busy but the biggest queue was for Turkish Gozleme. The trees behind look a little hazy, that is because the Scouts in the carnivore area had a good fire going.

The pansies are in pots cut from redgum. Not sure how long they would last. The donut van was a bit quiet. The most popular food among the kids was a fried spiral potato on a stick.

This very cute sock monkey caught my eye, I was told it was vintage, made in the 60s!

A potato farmer from Gembrook had nothing good to say about the industry. Supermarkets have reduced the maximum potato size from 450g to 400g, making a good portion of his crop unsellable. He has downsized his farm and grows only for market selling which is enough to keeps him busy enough to stay out of the house.

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My haul. A pot of  Narcissus “Tete a Tete” full of buds ready to burst open. I will keep them in the pot while they flower, then plant out next year. A rhododendron which I will keep in a pot as the one I have already is doing well like that. And a clutch of kipfler potatoes complete with Gembrook dirt.

New garden trend

I am sure this is going to take off all over the place. My garden is displaying this latest look in landscaping. A blanketing of oxalis!

A mystery: During summer a number of holes were dug in the garden overnight. I filled them in, but they were redug in the same places, usually near plant roots. The neighbours got a new dog and the mystery digging stopped.

But now the mystery animal is back. Each hole is the same shape, long and narrow. The one in the main picture is about 6 cm deep. Not at all like digging done by cats, dogs and no droppings in sight so I don’t think it would be a rabbit. I really hope rats are not habitual diggers. Would much rather it was an echidna or a bandicoot. Short of installing  very expensive infrared monitoring cameras I have no idea how to identify what is doing the digging.

The good news is that the animal only digs in open ground, so most of the garden is safe as it is covered in oxalis.

Autumn Gardening

The big achievement of the last month is cleaning out all the gutters. Quite a big task as leaves blow on to the roof all the time and in summer the tiny gum nuts rain down from the lemon scented gum. Usually I just make sure the house roof is clear as any blockage will cause a back flow of rain into the ceiling. Curse those concealed gutters!

This time it was impossible to ignore the great accumulation of mulch on the carport roof. IMG_5650

It took two afternoons of going up and down the ladder and scooping out handfuls of leaves and humus before the job was done. Both gutters were clear and a quick hosing flushed out any leaves in the pipe going to the tank.IMG_5652

The end result got the tick of approval from the gutter inspector. Although she thought the lights could do with a bit of a clean too.

A bonus tree for the garden, I think it might be a jacaranda as the one nearby had a few seed pods a year ago.IMG_5715

Florrie

Ever wondered what happened to the helium balloon after you accidentally let go of it? This morning I discovered Florrie resting on a small shrub next to the steps as I came in from fetching the morning paper.IMG_5477

It had been quite windy yesterday, so she could have spent time between the weekend and now stuck in the branches of the tree just above where she now rests.

After a little research I think by they way she has torn that it was the thinning atmosphere as she rose higher and higher that caused her demise.

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Balloon burst at approx 91,470 ft over San Francisco

Reminds me of the whole school balloon launches that were popular about 30 years ago. Sent off with optimism that the attached postcards would be returned after the seeds secured to them were planted. Some did come back, mainly from farmers in Gippsland happy to oblige the kids. Then there was the card that came all the way from Europe via the travelling friend of one of the teachers.

Since then we have learned of the harm all that stray latex and string brings to the environment, particularly sea creatures, so no more balloon launches.

Florrie tried a new life as a kitten toy, with limited success.

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Friday Update

Thinking like Vireya that Florrie came from a significant birthday celebration, I did some searching. Instead of a centenarian I discovered that Florrie is the name of a new venture located in High St, Armadale about 50 min away by road. The business sells a fancy doll and also hosts birthday parties. They sent me a lovely reply to my email.

Hello
I am very sorry to report that one of your balloons has flown all the way to Warranwood. It did not survive the trip.

 

Hi Jeanette,
That balloon sounds like it certainly went on an adventure! I am sure some little girl was very upset when it slipped from her grasp and began it’s journey.
Best wishes
Melody

Melody Sole
Head of Marketing and Online
www.florrie.com.au

Numerate Nelumbo

The lotus plant that grows in a water bowl is beginning to die down, it will be back again next summer. In a bit of a tidy up I cut off the seedpods and look at how they have grown. None are missing, this in the entire harvest.IMG_5401

Before you say anything, the one with five seeds did not have a sixth one, that flower did not form completely.

A hot day in Cranbourne

img_5275The sign says it all. Once again Leesa Chandler has brought together quilts and fabric to celebrate Australian flora at the beautiful Royal Botanic Gardens Cranbourne.

This year a bag challenge was added to the mix. Participants used the same pattern shape and make a bag of any size with an Australian theme.  The lively Blue Wren was by Sue de Vanny and Lauren of Ballarat had some fun with her Playschool’s Humpty visits Uluru. The one I would happily take home Coober Pedy Opals made by Chris of Eltham.

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Sue de Vanny is the featured textile artist, her appliqué technique really brings the subject to life. You may remember the remarkable quilt Tram Route No 10 which won viewer’s choice at  AQC in 2014.

Beginning True received an Honourable Mention at the same exhibition in 2015.

Here are some of other quilts that caught my eye in the downstair display, but were difficult to photograph because of the sun streaming in the windows.

The exhibition is open every day until March 5.

Even though the day was extremely hot I went out into the gardens looking for some planting ideas. The red sand garden seems to go on forever and the tractor just added to that vast vista.img_5306

The Swamp Lily Crinum pedunculaqum had a subtle perfume and is now on my planting list. I didn’t venture away from the main path after passing this sign, so the lily is the only new idea from today’s visit.

 

Although I really like weeping trees, these two Acacia cultriformis ‘Cascade’ are a bit extreme.
After seeing the prop on the venerable Grass Tree Xanthorrhoea johnsonii, I don’t feel so bad about the post holding up a branch of my weeping acacia. The foliage associated with the supported branch is at the top left. Before the branch was hefted up by two of the burly tree loppers allowing me to put the post underneath, the leaves were scraping the ground and the path below was blocked.

img_5318On the way out I spotted a wallaby enjoying the deep shade, it is usually Southern Brown bandicoots that can bee seen under the casuarina beside the path to the carpark, but not this day.

Finally, in the middle of nowhere, also known as Bullarto Rd West, some naked ladies. I always got these confused with Nerines, but thanks to Weednstitch I can correctly identify the Amaryllis belladonna growing beside the road.img_5321